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Zone 7 spans the western limb to selenographic longitude 50°W and
contains sights best observed two or three days before the full or new Moon.
KEY
Lunar 100 objects that have not yet been photographed.
Lunar 100 objects that have been photographed.
Other objects that have been photographed.
The Lunar 100 list is from "Introducing the Lunar 100" by Charles A. Wood (Sky & Telescope, Sky Publishing Corp., April 2004, Vol. 107, No. 4, pp. 113-120). All rights remain with Sky Publishing Corp. I (MSS) have transcribed this list for my personal use and any errors are mine.

Unless stated otherwise, all photographs will be oriented such that north is up and lunar west to the left.

17 Schroter's Valley Giant sinuous rille 26.2°N 50.8°W 168 km Rükl 18
22 Aristarchus Plateau Mysterious uplifted region mantled with pyroclastics 26.0°N 51.0°W 150 km Rükl 18
lunar100 11, 17, 22

04:12 - 04:21 UTC June 16, 2005
1/15 sec - f4.9 - ISO 400
3.0× telephoto
12.0 mm eyepiece (312x)
Six photos were combined, the red, green and blue components aligned, then an unsharp mask (2.0; 0.5; 0) applied.

The crater with the bright wall, its most easily observed feature, is Aristarchus (L11). The wall is actually distinctly terraced but the terracing is not evident in this photo. The highlands to the northwest is the Aristarchus plateau (L22). The plateau is a little more prominent in the Gruithuisen domes photo. West of Aristarchus and the Aristarchus plateau is Schroter's Valley (L17), a gigantic rille which was quite obvious this evening. To the east are the Montes Harbinger and to the northeast, the Gruithuisen domes and their associated lava field.



42 Marius Hills Complex of volcanic domes and hills 12.5°N 54.0°W 125 km Rükl 28,29
lunar100 42

04:13 UTC July 8, 2006
1/15 sec - f4.9 - ISO 200
3.0× telephoto
12.5 mm eyepiece (300x)
This is a combination of twenty photos. An unsharp mask (3.0, 1.0, 0.0) was applied to each photo, then the photos were then averaged in groups of four. An unsharp mask (2.0, 1.0, 0.0) was applied to the groups. The groups were combined and another unsharp mask (2.0, 1.0, 0.0) applied.

The crater near the center of the photo is Marius. Scattered all around to the west are the Marius Hills. With the right light and good seeing, what a surprise.



62 Rümker Hills Large volcanic dome 40.8°N 58.1°W 70 km Rükl 8
lunar100 62

04:08 UTC July 8, 2006
1/8 sec - f4.9 - ISO 200
3.0× telephoto
12.5 mm eyepiece (300x)
This is a combination of twelve photos. An unsharp mask (3.0, 1.0, 0.0) was applied to each photo, then the photos were then averaged in groups of four. An unsharp mask (2.0, 1.0, 0.0) was applied again. The groups were combined and another unsharp mask (2.0, 0.5, 0.0) applied.

Photographing the Rümker Hills is as much an issue of timing, to get the favorable shadows, as it is skill. Under this light, this turned out to be an interesting region. Note Mons Rümker to the south and the other domes in the region.



91 De Gasparis Rilles Area with many rilles 25.9°S 50.7°W 30 km Rükl 51
lunar100 13, 44, 91

02:34 UTC April 1, 2004
1/4 sec - f4.9 - ISO 400
3.0× telephoto
12.5 mm eyepiece (300x)
unsharp mask (3.0; 1.00; 0)
Note that this image has not been reduced for display and so is effectively twice the magnification of the other photos. North is to the upper-left

The larger crater with central peaks to the northeast is Gassendi (L13). The fractured floor of this crater is not clearly visible in this photo with this sun angle but some lighter "lines", sunlight reflected off some fractures are visible giving hints of this structure. The flat region below and to the east is Mare Humorum.

The crater with the domed floor to the southwest of the photo is Mersenius (L44) which has the "micro" craters. Three or four of these micro craters are just visible in this image.

Finally, note the linear depressions or channels to the southwest. This is the de Gasparis Rille region (L91). It looks like one can trace these past the east side of Mersenius up to the west side of Gassendi.



94 Drygalski Large south-pole region crater 79.3°S 84.9°W 149 km Rükl 72,VI
Drygalski

04:33 UTC January 13, 2006
1/60 sec - f4.9 - ISO 100
3.0× telephoto
12.0 mm eyepiece (312x)
This is a combination of ten B&W photos. I enhanced the contrast and applied an unsharp mask (3.0; 1.0; 0.0) to each. I averaged the individual images and, again, applied an unsharp mask (3.0; 1.0; 0.0) and enhanced the contrast. The shadowing in the corners is vignetting. The camera is seeing to the edge of the eyepiece. Move the cursor over the image to see crater indentied.

Drygalski is visible because of libration. The Leibnitz Mountains appear to the right.



Last modified: 2009-07-05