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Zone 4 spans selenographic longitude 10°W to 10°E and contains
sights best observed near the first- or third-quarter Moon.
KEY
Lunar 100 objects that have not yet been photographed.
Lunar 100 objects that have been photographed.
Other objects that have been photographed.
The Lunar 100 list is from "Introducing the Lunar 100" by Charles A. Wood (Sky & Telescope, Sky Publishing Corp., April 2004, Vol. 107, No. 4, pp. 113-120). All rights remain with Sky Publishing Corp. I (MSS) have transcribed this list for my personal use and any errors are mine.

Unless stated otherwise, all photographs will be oriented such that north is up and lunar west to the left.

4 Apennines Imbrium basin rim 18.9°N 3.7°W 400 km Rükl 22
lunar4

01:30 UTC January 8, 2006
1/8 sec - f4.9 - ISO 100
3.0× telephoto
25.0 mm eyepiece with barlow (291.8×)
This is an average of eight images. The red-green-blue components were aligned, the contrast enhanced slightly and an unsharp mask (3.0; 1.0; 0) was applied.

The Apennine Mountains are part of the Mare Imbrium basin. The creation of this basin scoured the lunar landscape resulting in features like the Imbrium sculpture and the Gylden Valley. The more prominent crater on the southeast side of the mountains is Conon. The smaller one east-northeast of Conon but still on the slopes is Joy. On the other side of the mountains from Joy is Hadley Rille which is not evident in this photo. Ina caldera is in the flat area just to the southeast of Conon but this picture isn't of a quality to capture it even if the light was right.



15 Straight Wall Best example of a lunar fault 21.8°S 7.8°W 130 km Rükl 54
46 Regiomontanus central peak Possible volcanic peak 28.0°S 0.6°W 108 km Rükl 55
lunar15, 46

01:14 UTC January 8, 2006
1/8 sec - f4.9 - ISO 100
3.0× telephoto
25.0 mm eyepiece with barlow (291.8×)
This is an average of ten images. The red-green-blue components were aligned, the contrast enhanced slightly and an unsharp mask (3.0; 1.0; 0) was applied.

Regiomontanus is the mid-sized crater with the off-center peak. Note the shadow on the top of that peak. This is indeed a crater on the top of this peak and suggests the mountain is of volcanic origin (L46).



19 Alpine Valley Lunar graben 49.0°N 3.0°E 165 km Rükl 4
lunar15, 46

03:50 UTC June 14, 2008
1/8 sec - f4.9 - ISO 100
3.0× telephoto & 2.0× digital
12.5 mm eyepiece(600.0×)
This is an average of eight images. The contrast enhanced slightly and an unsharp mask (3.0; 1.0; 0) was applied.

A favorite of amateurs, the Alpine Valley dramatically slices through the lunar Alps. Five miles wide and eighty miles long, it contains a rille and several small craters not seen in this photo.



28 Hipparchus Subject of first drawing of a single crater 5.5°S 4.8°E 150 km Rükl 44,45
lunar28

01:55 UTC January 7, 2006
1/8 sec - f4.9 - ISO 100
3.0× telephoto
25.0 mm eyepiece with barlow (291.8×)
This is an average of sixteen images. The red-green-blue components were aligned, the contrast enhanced slightly and an unsharp mask (3.0; 1.0; 0) was applied.

Hipparchus and Albategnius, the large crater below, were quite prominent this night. Love that series of diminishing craters starting at Hipparchus' SSE rim and arcing off to the north-east.



47 Alphonsus dark spots Dark-halo eruptions on crater floor 13.7°S 3.2°W 119 km Rükl 44
75 Ptolemaeus B Saucerlike depression on the floor of Ptolemaeus 8.0°S 0.8°W 164 km Rükl 44
92 Gylden Valley Part of the Imbrium radial sculpture 5.1°S 0.7°E 47 km Rükl 44
lunar47, 75, 92

01:37 UTC January 8, 2006
1/8 sec - f4.9 - ISO 100
3.0× telephoto
25.0 mm eyepiece with barlow (291.8×)
This is an average of ten images. The red-green-blue components were aligned, the contrast enhanced slightly and an unsharp mask (3.0; 1.0; 0) was applied.

The primary purpose of this photo was to get Ptolemaeus B (L75). It would be just north of the small crater (Ptolemaeus A) inside the larger, flat floored crater, Ptolemaeus. There's a slight hint of a lighter rim with a shadow on the east but is no more certain than other variations on the floor. However, the Gylden Valley (L92) is to the north-northeast. Just to its east is the heavily degraded crater Gylden. The promenant crater just to the north is Herschel. To the south is Alphonsus. It looks like I caught two of the dark spots (L47), one on the crater floor near the rim at the 4 o'clock position and one at the 9 o'clock. Others are in shadows to the east. Ranger 9 landed inside Alphonsus.



Last modified: 2009-05-02