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Zone 1 spans selenographic longitude 50°E to the eastern limb and
contains sights best observed two or three days after the new or full Moon.
KEY
Lunar 100 objects that have not yet been photographed.
Lunar 100 objects that have been photographed.
Other objects that have been photographed.
The Lunar 100 list is from "Introducing the Lunar 100" by Charles A. Wood (Sky & Telescope, Sky Publishing Corp., April 2004, Vol. 107, No. 4, pp. 113-120). All rights remain with Sky Publishing Corp. I (MSS) have transcribed this list for my personal use and any errors are mine.

Unless stated otherwise, all photographs will be oriented such that north is up and lunar west to the left.

56 Mare Australe A partially flooded ancient basin 49.8°S 84.5°E 132 km Rükl 76
lunar100 56

04:28 UTC January 13, 2006
1/60 sec - f4.9 - ISO 100
3.0× telephoto
12.0 mm eyepiece (312.5×)
This is an average of six B&W images. I enhanced the contrast and applied an unsharp mask (3.0; 1.0; 0.0) to each. I combined the individual images and, again, applied an unsharp mask (3.0; 1.0; 0.0) and enhanced the contrast. The shadowing in the corners is vignetting. The camera is seeing to the edge of the filed of view and has captured the circular edge of the eyepiece.

Mare Australe is darker region near the edge of the lunar face and was slightly more visible this night because of libration. Projection makes Mare Australe look like a long scar but, face on, it is appears more like a circular ring of smaller, filled basins.



40 Janssen Rille Rare example of a highland rille 45.4°S 39.3°E 199 km Rükl 67,68
58 Rheita Valley Basin secondary-crater chain 42.5°S 51.5°E 445 km Rükl 68
lunar100 40, 58

01:12 UTC April 15, 2005
1/15 sec - f4.9 - ISO 400
3.0× telephoto
12.0 mm eyepiece (312x)
This is an average of two images with an unsharp mask (5.0; 0.5; 0) applied.

Janssen Rille lies in Janssen crater. The illumination is not optimal here but one can just make out the valley extending northward and slightly west of the central peak of the crater, then looping back to the east towards the smaller overlapping crater, Fabricius.

To the northeast is Rheita Valley. Not a valley as we normally think of it, Rheita is actually believed to be a chain of closely spaced, overlapping craters.



73 Smythii basin Difficult-to-observe basin scarp and mare 2.0°S 87.0°E 740 km Rükl 38,49
lunar100 73

01:48 UTC January 7, 2006
1/15 sec - f4.9 - ISO 100
3.0× telephoto
25.0 mm eyepiece with barlow (291.8×)
This is an average of five images. The red-green-blue components were aligned, the contrast enhanced slightly and an unsharp mask (3.0; 1.0; 0) was applied.

Mare Smythii is darker region near the edge of the lunar face. It was slightly more visible this night because of libration. The edge of the lunar disk is irregular in this region but it was near local noon there so no shadows are cast to reveal the topography.



88 Peary Difficult-to-observe polar crater 88.6°N 95.3°E 104 km Rükl 4,II
lunar100 88

03:06 UTC July 7, 2006
1/8 sec - f4.9 - ISO 200
3.0× telephoto
12.5 mm eyepiece (300x)
This is a combination of nine photos. The brightness was adjusted and an unsharp mask applied (3.0; 1.0; 0.0) to the individual photos. These were combined and an unsharp mask applied (3.0; 1.0; 0.0) applied again.

A large northern libration allowed for a nice view of the Moon's northern pole. Even so, spotting Peary was difficult. The Moon's north and south poles have been in the news recently because of their potential value as lunar bases because of their access to year-round sunlight for power and the possibility of water ice hidden in the perpetual shadows. The large crater in from on Peary is Byrd.



Last modified: 2009-04-25